It’s a documented fact: people on holiday often romanticise about meeting a stranger and enjoying a whirlwind romance. The unfortunate reality is that many of us fall flat in our attempts due to language barriers and cultural differences. So, we got together our well-travelled staff to share their knowledge, and for some… personal experience. Names have been changed to protect their identities. After all, “what happens in Vegas…” yea, you know the rest.

Seeing as how the French are often perceived as great lovers, it was only natural that we started with our resident French expert, Jolie. Unfortunately, the answer was not quite what we were looking for. There is no magical pick-up line; in fact pick-up lines don’t work in France. They are viewed as jokes and not taken seriously. But here’s a tip we managed to pick up from www.askmen.com: French women love accents (unfortunately referring to American accents). Singlish, unfortunately, is untested, but why not give it a shot.

And if you really have to, “Ton père il vend pas des fusils? Parce que t’es trop canon.” Translation: Your father doesn’t sell guns? Because you’re really a bombshell.

Moving on to Koreans. Here, we had no lack of ‘experts’: K-drama lovers, Korean boy band devotees, Korean BBQ fans, you get the idea. However, we stuck to the editorial integrity, for which we are so known for and asked Melody, who holds a level 2 certification in Korean for some dating pick-up lines.

–          jinzha ye-bbor-yo (really pretty)

–          gwi-yeop-tta (cute)

–          Jeon-hwa beon-ho ju-se-yo (Can I have your phone number?)

–          Nuh Ahrum da wuh (You are beautiful.)

–          Sool sah jul guh? (Can I buy you a drink?)

Melody adds a disclaimer, “Whether it’s easy to pick up Koreans, it depends, because some can still be conservative and only open up within their own clique. But let’s say you go to the night scene and be all smiley, you might get lucky ’cause some Koreans are attracted to foreigners. From personal experience though, it will be more useful to flirt with shop aunties and uncles more because they can give discounts if they like you!”

Achtung Baby! That’s as far as my knowledge of German goes. Luckily, we have someone who speaks some German, which is infinitely better than my two words; hmm, make that one. Ting Ting has an up-till-now secret obsession with German useless phrases, such as, “ab zwanzig gramm wirds undeutlich” (If you have 20 grams in your mouth, you’re incomprehensible), and was not so forthcoming with dating tips. We think she wants to keep the German guys to herself.

Threatening to gas her, we managed to coerce the following line out of her, “Hallo, ich stelle mich mal besser zu dir, sonst sprechen dich noch irgendwelche fremden Männer an.” Google Translate has it something to the effect of: I’d better introduce myself, before some strange man comes to talk to you. Not the finest German literary saying, although the effort in memorising that tongue twister will certainly gain you some brownie points.

Apologies if you’ve felt up till now that the advice given has been anything but useful. I shall make amends with a line that has been proven to work with at least one Singaporean girl. In Russian, “Vi takzhe krasivy kak nochnaya zvezda.” Translated: You are only as beautiful as a star in the night sky. Except stars only shine at night. Awww. We know who fell for that one!

Now, nobody knows romance better than Bollywood? And nobody knows Bollywood better than the one in the office with Starhub channels 125, 126 and 127. Madhuri (no, not the real one) had this Hindi pick-up line to share, “Kya mast dikhti hai. Mere saath chalegi.” That roughly translates to, “You are hot. Will you come with me?” That’s right, get to the point guys.

Finally, what’s love without animals? Ying was travelling in Egypt when a local tried to pick her up with this line, “How many camels you want?” I’m not sure if that indecent proposal works with local Egyptian girls, or how you’re going to procure camels. This line unfortunately did not work with Ying, or so we’re told.